Pagoda Dogwood (Cornus alternifolia)

$6.00

68 in stock

Sold individually / Min. 6 inch height / $6 per plant / Individual peat pot size 3.5” x 3.75″ /  Can be planted in peat pot for easy transplanting


Please, don’t delay ordering – first come first serve!

By placing an order, you understand that there is no guarantee on survivability on any plants sold. There are no refunds or exchanges – if it is determined that you got a damaged plant you will be provided with a replacement, species dependent on stock availability. Orders will be fulfilled with stock that is conservation grade for the conservation natured purpose of this low-cost seedling program.

Once orders are picked up please make any claims of damaged or unhealthy plants within 24 hours after pickup, photos are encouraged.

68 in stock

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Description

It is a small deciduous shrub or tree growing to 25 feet (8 m) (rarely 30 feet (9 m)) tall, with a trunk up to 6 inches (152 mm) in diameter. The branches develop characteristic horizontal layers separated by gaps, with a flat-topped crown. Its leaves are elliptic to ovate and grow to 2–5 inches (5–13 cm) long and 1–2 inches (25–51 mm) broad, arranged alternately on the stems, not in opposite pairs typical of the majority of Cornus species. The leaves are most often arranged in crowded clusters around the ends of the twigs and appear almost whorled. The upper sides of the leaves are smooth and green, while the undersides are hairy and a bluish color. The bark is colored gray to brown, becoming ridged as it ages. Small cream colored flowers are produced, with four small petals. The flowers are grouped into cymes, with the inflorescence’s 2–5 inches (5–13 cm) across. It bears berries with a blackish blue color

C. alternifolia is found under open deciduous trees, as well as along the margins of forests and swamps. These trees prefer moist, well drained soil.

Seedlings are shade-tolerant and it is often found as an understory tree in mature forests, such as those dominated by Acer saccharum (sugar maple) or Populus (aspen). It is also common in younger forests.

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