Bur Oak (Quercus macrocarpa) – One 4″ Tree Pot

$10.35

21 in stock

Tolerant of a variety of moisture and soil conditions, adapts well to urban settings. Its fringed acorns are food for wildlife. A very long-lived tree. Prefers full sun. Grows 70′ to 80′, 80′ spread. (zones 3-8)

 

Sold individually / Min. 8 inch height / $10.35 per plant / Individual pot size 4” x 6”


Please, don’t delay ordering – first come first serve!

By placing an order, you understand that there is no guarantee on survivability on any plants sold. There are no refunds or exchanges – if it is determined that you got a damaged plant you will be provided with a replacement, species dependent on stock availability. Orders will be fulfilled with stock that is conservation grade for the conservation natured purpose of this low-cost seedling program.

ONCE ORDERS ARE PICKED UP PLEASE MAKE ANY CLAIMS OF DAMAGED OR UNHEALTHY PLANTS WITHIN 24 HOURS AFTER PICKUP, PHOTOS ARE ENCOURAGED.

21 in stock

Description

Bur oak is a large, deciduous tree with a very wide, open crown. Usually wider than tall, the tree can exceed 100 ft. in height and width. The massive trunk supports heavy, horizontal limbs and rough, deep-ridged bark. Leaves up to 9 inches long with a central midrib from which branch veins lead into rounded lobes. Lobes separated by deep sinuses reaching, in some cases, to within 1/2 inch of the midrib. Lobes beyond the midpoint of the blade wavy margined and longer and broader than those toward the base. Acorns large, up to 1 1/2 inches broad with 1/4 to more than 1/2 of the acorn enclosed in the cup. Cup with coarse scales and a fringed margin.

The acorns of this species, distinguished by very deep fringed cups, are the largest of all native oaks. The common name (sometimes spelled “Burr”) describes the cup of the acorn, which slightly resembles the spiny bur of a chestnut. Bur Oak is the northernmost New World oak. In the West, it is a pioneer tree, bordering and invading the prairie grassland. Planted for shade, ornament, and shelter belts. Bur oak extends farther north than any other oak species and becomes shrubby at the northern and eastern limits of its range.

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